Media and public relations

Page owner: Marketing and PR director

Supporting professional standards in editorial work

The CIEP is a non-profit body promoting excellence in English language editing.

We set and demonstrate editorial standards and offer a community, learning hub and support network for copyeditors and proofreaders – the people who work to make text accurate, clear and fit for purpose.

How to get in touch

Journalists and editors seeking comment on any matter relating to the CIEP, or to editorial issues in general, should contact our marketing and PR director.

Our charter and what it means for the profession

The CIEP has chartership status. We’re using the official recognition and authority that come with our charter to promote good editing based on recognised qualifications, high standards and a better understanding of what editorial professionals do.

Why Editing Matters introduces the Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading (CIEP) and shows why everyone producing written text needs a good editor.

Why Editing Matters

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Working with global language experts

David Crystal

 

Our honorary president is David Crystal OBE. David is a language expert and prolific author who has published over 100 books, including The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language and The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language, as well as a CIEP paper that examines the role of the professional editor.

Lynne Murphy

 

Lynne Murphy is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Sussex and author of The Prodigal Tongue: The love–hate relationship between British and American English. Lynne has delivered lectures and keynotes at our annual conference, written a CIEP paper on global Englishes and regularly delights readers from all over the world with her blog, Separated by a Common Language.

Rob Drummond

 

Rob Drummond, Reader in Sociolinguistics at Manchester Metropolitan University, has also spoken at our annual conference and written a paper for us that asks: what makes swearing so linguistically interesting in form and function?